Bol d’Or 1972 Laverda 3CL 1000 Endurance Racer

Bol d’Or 1972 Laverda 3CL 1000 Endurance Racer

Technical Specs Type;   Bol D’Or 1000 Year; 1972 Displacement ; 981cc Engine type; DOHC 2 valve, three cylinder Frame type; steel double cradle Transmission;  5 speed Power output; 90bhp Maximum speed; 240kph Number produced;  1 It is a copy of an endurance racer that raced in the 1972 Bol’Dor 24 hour race. Since completion it has done five laps of Mallory Park Circuit. It was ridden by the original Laverda works tester, at the Festival of a Thousand Bikes, back in July 2009. The tank was made by hand from a flat sheet of allumunium, after first making a full size wooden buck from laminating plywood together to get the initial shape. The bottom of the tank had to be made in such a way that it fitted neatly onto the frame, missing anything that got in the way. It was then sprayed Laverda Orange as was the rest of the bike. The Marchal headlights are a replica of the original bike. Every nut bolt and washer, every bearing, has been new from the outset. No expense was spared on the building of this bike. It is the only one in existence. Featuring the huge Fontana four leading shoe front brake, Marzocci headlights, all engine internals, including a fully balanced crank and gearbox internals, with new bearings throughout. Petrol tank hand made to the exact spec of the original bike, seat and rear squab also. Exhaust silencers and down pipes all made to fit the slightly tilted back engine setting to aid ground clearance, as the original. Technical Specs Type;   Bol D’Or 1000 Year; 1972 Displacement ; 981cc Engine...
Oldscool Special Trident

Oldscool Special Trident

“There are many other beautiful café racers that already exist, but this one was built to put those in its shadow.” When I first read the email from Belgium workshop ‘Oldscool Mechanics’ that brash statement left me feeling a little apprehensive. As I read on however I started to understand where the confidence behind that statement came from. This was no ordinary build. Rather than following the classic cafe racer recipe these guys had started out with something a bit left of field, instantly making it unique. They’d also used their experience in racing to fabricate parts that you won’t find on any other bike, parts that were put together for the express purpose of making the bike better. Finally, and most importantly they’re proud of what they’ve done, and while it’s easy to start naming other bikes to compare this one to I have to admire a man (or men) who is proud of his own work. The man who formulated the build was a Belgian by the name of Bernard. Bernard’s love for classic British motorcycles spanned back to his childhood. Watching his father work on his Norton Commando and Trident T150 he learnt the intricacies of English mechanics. So years later, when the time came to put his cafe racer project together he wanted to create something unique. His Dad’s old Trident triple came to mind so he sourced himself a 1975 example. To put his vision together he was going to need a few extra, highly skilled hands, so he enlisted the help of Ivan from ‘Oldscool Mechanics’ in Antwerp. Bernard was attracted to the...